Seminars & Conferences

Monday, April 23. HealthLink Seminar. Pelvic Floor Disorders and Organ Prolapse
6 to 7 p.m. Marcellus Free Library, 32 Maple St., Marcellus. Nearly one in four women in the United States have a pelvic floor disorder that can cause incontinence, discomfort and limit activity. Learn preventive measures and treatments. Registration is required. Call 464-8668 to register.
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Tuesday, April 24. HealthLink Seminar. Where to Find Credible Health Information
5 to 6 p.m. Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse.  Learn where to find it in your own backyard. Registration is required. Call 464-8668 to register.
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Tuesday, April 24. HealthLink Seminar. Diabetic Foot
6 to 7 p.m. Community Room, The Hearth at Greenpoint, 150 Old Liverpool Rd., Liverpool. Diabetic foot ulcers can be difficult to treat. Learn how the Wound Care Center at Upstate University Hospital at Community General can help. Registration is required. Call 464-8668 to register.
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Wednesday, April 25. HealthLink Seminar. Interactions: Over-the-Counter Medications and Herbal Supplements
6 to 7 p.m. HealthLink, 6333 Rt. 298, East Syracuse. Medications can lose their effectiveness, or worse, when taken with other prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, or herbal supplements. Learn common interactions. Registration is required. Call 464-8668 to register.
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Wednesday, April 25. Intelligent Conversation Series. Personalized Medicine: Tailoring Healthcare in the Information Age
7 p.m. Grewen Auditorium, LeMoyne College, Syracuse. Technological innovations and specialization have changed the way medicine is practiced over the past century. Yet in spite of the fact that the United States spends twice as much per person on medical care as other industrialized nations, significant health inequalities still exist. Many physicians and patients question the effectiveness of the current model for providing health care and are exploring different approaches to medicine. Join local experts in a series of discussions on different aspects of this important topic. Panelists from Upstate Medical University are Robert W. West, PhD and Robert S. Olick, JD, PhD. Registration is not required. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 443-4846 or email cmkarlho@uc.syr.edu.
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Thursday, April 26. Autism Awareness Conference. Children with Social, Emotional and Behavioral Challenges Including Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Collaborative Problem Solving Approach
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel and Conference Center, 801 University Ave., Syracuse. Presented by Ross Greene, PhD, director of the non-profit organization Lives in the Balance and author of The Explosive Child and Lost at School. Sponsored by Upstate’s Margaret L. Williams Developmental Evaluation Center in conjunction with the CNY Coalition for Young Children with Special Needs. Parents and professionals invited. To register or for more information, call  472-4404.
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Monday, April 30. HealthLink Seminar. Exercise and the Aging Brain
6 to 7 p.m. Liverpool Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool. Research shows that physical activity promotes brain health and delays dementia. Learn about the research and how to do exercises that improve brain health.  Registration is required. Call 464-8668 to register.
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Wednesday, May 2. Intelligent Conversation Series. Narrative Medicine: Using Literature and Patients’ Stories to Improve Health Care
7 p.m. Grewen Auditorium, LeMoyne College, Syracuse. The relationship between doctor and patient can be a matter of life and death, yet with the increasing use of technology in medicine and growing patient loads, medicine is becoming increasingly depersonalized. Narrative medicine uses poems, novels, and particularly stories written by people with illness and disability to help doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals improve healthcare by listening to patients’ stories and recognizing patients’ authority. Panelists from Upstate Medical University are Rebecca Garden, PhD, and Joel Potash, MD. Registration is not required. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 443-4846 or email cmkarlho@uc.syr.edu.
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Saturday, May 5. Annual Regional Stroke Conference: Time is a Brain
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Medical Alumni Aud., Weiskotten Hall. This conference will review the latest evidence in emergency evaluation and acute management of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In addition, the latest approaches to the prevention of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases as well as postacute care and rehabilitation will be reviewed. Concrete examples of clinical decision making and treatment including controversial topics will be provided through the use of lectures, open forum and case presentations. For course information and fees, contact Maria Lumbrazo, MS, RN, FNP-C, 315-289-2706 or 315-464-3931, email Lumbrazm@upstate.edu.
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Wednesday, May 9. Diversity Lecture Series. Bridges Out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals
12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Ninth Floor Auditorium, Weiskotten Hall. This introduction will touch on basic elements of understanding and addressing the challenges of poverty within the context of health and patient care. Presented by Angela M. Douglas, administrator for the Onondaga County Bridges Coalition. The lecture is part of Upstate’s Diversity Lecture series, Achieving Excellence Through Diversity: Walk the Talk.  For more information, contact the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at 464-5234.
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Tuesday, May 15. College of Graduate Studies annual Distinguished Alumni Lecture. Cortical Organization of Limb Movements: My Scientific Journey
Noon. 2231 Weiskotten Hall. Internationally known neuroscience researcher Paul D. Cheney, PhD, of the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) will present. Dr. Cheney received a PhD from Upstate in 1975 after graduating magna cum laude from SUNY Fredonia. He chairs the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology at KUMC. Dr. Cheney focuses on brain control of movement and neurological disease associated with HIV/AIDS. He has been a pioneer in developing electrophysiological methods for relating signals in the brain to behavior, and using these methods to understand neural mechanisms underlying voluntary movement. His findings are relevant to understanding impairments associated with stroke and Parkinson’s disease, as well as the development of neuroprosthetic devices to restore function in spinal cord injury.
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